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NAHM2021: Speaker | Agnes Woodward, “Residential Schools and Healing through Art”

NAHM 2021 Agnes Woodward Image

Speaker: Agnes Woodward, “Residential Schools and Healing through Art”

Hosted by: Shannon Manuelito

Presentation overview:

"Our lived experiences as Indigenous People matter and sharing our journeys to healthy autonomy is a valuable source of knowledge. I share my family's experiences as a way to further awareness and to foster solidarity through compassion, and empathy. My father is a Residential School survivor and it took many years for me to understand his life journey and the ways his experiences impacted my childhood. As a mother, I have gained knowledge and tools that have helped me to break generational cycles that can no longer continue."

Join by Webex:

https://maricopa.webex.com/maricopa/j.php?MTID=m491df3d1169a881656b22d09b05ae112

Wednesday, Nov 17, 2021 12:00 pm | 1 hour | (UTC-07:00) Arizona

Event number: 2486 516 9116

Event password: YeJyUEPa663 (93598372 from phones)

Join by phone

+1-602-666-0783 United States Toll (Phoenix)

Access code: 248 651 69116


Speaker Bio:

Agnes Woodward is Plains Cree from Kawacatoose First Nation, Saskatchewan, Canada. Agnes is a wife, mother,  Grassroots Organizer, activist and co-owner/designer of ReeCreeations. She has lived in North Dakota for the last 17 years. She designed and created the now-famous ribbon skirt worn by Secretary Deb Haaland during Haaland's swearing in ceremony.  She is a self-taught seamstress who uses her ribbon skirts to complement her activism in the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) and Residential school movements. Agnes will talk about her experiences and healing through art.

Her father is a Residential School Survivor and her mother is a sixties scoop survivor. Through her family's lived experiences she understands how assimilation policies have impacted Indigenous Peoples. Agnes uses her personal experiences and art to amplify Indigenous voices and to empower Indigenous people, bring healing, visibility and connection to Indiegnous identity.