Grants

Grant FAQs

As a grant seeker, you may have some questions about grants in general and the grant development process at EMCC. This section may help to answer some of the questions you have. To navigate back to the main EMCC Grants Page click HERE.

A grant is a financial award that is given by an organization (like a charitable foundation, a corporation or the government) that is to be used for a particular purpose.

Unlike loans, grants do not have to be repaid. However, the grantee typically reports back to the grantor on how the funds were used.

As grant Project Administrator (PA), you will be responsible for meeting the requirements of the grantor agency requirements: reporting, timelines, measuring deliverables, and managing grant issues that arise. As you navigate the process, it’s important to have a complete understanding of the grant proposal, the agency’s terms, and Estrella Mountain Community College policies and procedures. Many resources are available to assist the Project Administrator (PA) in these efforts.

The Principal Investigator (PI) is charged to conduct objective research that generates independent, high quality, and reproducible results. The Principal Investigator is responsible for the management and integrity of the design, conduct, and reporting of the research project and for managing, monitoring, and ensuring the integrity of any collaborative relationships. Additionally, the Principal Investigator (PI) is responsible for the direction and oversight of compliance, financial, personnel, and other related aspects of the research project and for coordination with school, department, and Maricopa Community College (MCCCD) personnel to ensure research is conducted in accordance with federal regulations and sponsoring agency policies and procedures.

At EMCC, the Principal Investigator (PI) must be a Residential Faculty, Dean, Vice President or President. A full-time staff member can also act as a Co-PI for a grant if the other Co-PI is a Residential Faculty, Dean, Vice President, or President.  A Co-Principal Investigator is recognized by the funding agency as an individual who shares with the PI the responsibility for the conduct of a research project, including meeting the reporting requirements.

In the MCCCD system, the Principal Investigator (PI) reports to the Project Administrator (PA) that is a Dean, Vice President or higher to ensure organizational checks and balances and integrity as a public institution conducting research. 

Many entities are eligible to apply for grants, including nonprofits, , colleges, schools and school districts, even municipalities. Individuals (such as students, teachers, artists and researchers) can also apply for certain opportunities. Federal, state, foundation, and corporate grants are available to faculty, teachers, K-12 schools, nonprofit organizations, and colleges and universities. The primary source of grant funding by far is the Federal Government, followed by individual giving, and foundation and corporate support. Federal funding includes both federal entitlements or formula funds, and competitive grants.

The types of grants available to EMCC staff and faculty are what are known as “program grants” or “categorical program grants”. This means these grant is either tied directly to a specific grant category and program that the funds must be used for, or, the grant is tied to specific programmatic support. These grants can range from municipal, county, state, and federal to non-profit foundational. 

Federal, state, foundation, and corporate grants are available to faculty, teachers, K-12 schools, nonprofit organizations, and colleges and universities. The primary source of grant funding by far is the Federal Government, followed by individual giving, and foundation and corporate support. Federal funding includes both federal entitlements or formula funds, and competitive grants.

You can assess if your grant idea aligns with District and College Planning by reviewing those plans online at EMCC Strategic Planning and MCCCD 

You can review the information on the MCCCD IRB page to help you acclimate to the requirements of the District and colleges.

The amount of time and work it takes to prepare a grant application is a direct function of the number of people on your project team. Most grants have six to eight weeks between the time the application is released and when the proposal is due. For larger, more complex grant proposals, this may not be enough time. Planning well in advance of the application release date can give you a head start and alleviate some of the pressure.

Please review this article by The Chronicle of Higher Education on ten common grant writing mistakes.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/10-Common-Grant-Writing/242150